RSPB

largest nature conservation charity UK

strategy

The charity was considering changing its name to increase membership. Socha Design provided strategic direction for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and advised them not to do so.

about the charity

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) is the largest charitable organisation registered in the UK.

It works to promote the conservation and protection of birds. Plus it protects the wider environment through public awareness campaigns. And, through the operation of nature reserves not limited to the United Kingdom.

 

strategy

In 2012 RSPB decided to update its brand identity to increase public support and its membership scheme. This as a response to the news that 60% of the wildlife species studied have declined over recent decades.

They said “We need to change people’s perceptions of who we are and what we do. So we can get even more support for saving nature. Our new logo and strapline are just a small part of how we will do this.”

The charity began to research this with its employees and volunteers on the intranet, as they were seriously considering changing its name to cover a broader spectrum of nature preservation and gain more public support.

During the time of the rebranding, Jozef (Socha Design founder) was working with the charity as a graphic designer and marketing assistant. He opened up a forum on the intranet. There he explained the importance of not changing the name, for the following reasons.

 

recommendations

‘’First of all, preservation of the natural heritage is the core task of the RSPB charity. We need to stay consistent in all what we do. This we need to reflect also in our strategies. What I mean is that while we are preserving the natural heritage, we should also protect the brand heritage. The current brand reaches back as far as 1889. Emily Williamson in Manchester founded the charity, and we should preserve her legacy, not neglect it by changing the charity’s name to gain more public support and finances.

If we change the charity’s name, we possibly face a damaging critique.

Secondly and most importantly, to enter the territories of well-established nature and wildlife preserving organisations such as; The Wildlife Trust, The Woodland Trust, The Natural Resources Defense Council and The World Wide Fund (WWF), just to mention a few, could be fatal for the RSPB altogether.

The RSPB is a well-recognised organisation protecting birds for over 123 years. This gives the organisation a unique differentiation advantage on the market. I firmly believe that we should keep the organisation’s name as it is and consider different strategies to increase public support to allow us to do more for the natural heritage and protect it for the future generations. And I hope that I am not the only one.‘’ Jozef said.

The forum had the most views in a week than any other on the RSPB’s intranet. More than 2,000 impressions and many comments supporting Jozef’s statement helped to preserve the charity’s name and heritage.

Furthermore, the name of the charity and its history became one of the main focus points on the RSPB’s website.

client
RSPB

sector
charity

discipline
strategy

about the charity

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) is the largest charitable organisation registered in the UK.

It works to promote the conservation and protection of birds. Plus it protects the wider environment through public awareness campaigns. And, through the operation of nature reserves not limited to the United Kingdom.

strategy

In 2012 RSPB decided to update its brand identity to increase public support and its membership scheme. This as a response to the news that 60% of the wildlife species studied have declined over recent decades.

They said “We need to change people’s perceptions of who we are and what we do. So we can get even more support for saving nature. Our new logo and strapline are just a small part of how we will do this.”

The charity began to research this with its employees and volunteers on the intranet, as they were seriously considering changing its name to cover a broader spectrum of nature preservation and gain more public support.

During the time of the rebranding, Jozef (Socha Design founder) was working with the charity as a graphic designer and marketing assistant. He opened up a forum on the intranet. There he explained the importance of not changing the name, for the following reasons.

recommendations

‘’First of all, preservation of the natural heritage is the core task of the RSPB charity. We need to stay consistent in all what we do. This we need to reflect also in our strategies. What I mean is that while we are preserving the natural heritage, we should also protect the brand heritage. The current brand reaches back as far as 1889. Emily Williamson in Manchester founded the charity, and we should preserve her legacy, not neglect it by changing the charity’s name to gain more public support and finances.

If we change the charity’s name, we possibly face a damaging critique.

Secondly and most importantly, to enter the territories of well-established nature and wildlife preserving organisations such as; The Wildlife Trust, The Woodland Trust, The Natural Resources Defense Council and The World Wide Fund (WWF), just to mention a few, could be fatal for the RSPB altogether.

The RSPB is a well-recognised organisation protecting birds for over 123 years. This gives the organisation a unique differentiation advantage on the market. I firmly believe that we should keep the organisation’s name as it is and consider different strategies to increase public support to allow us to do more for the natural heritage and protect it for the future generations. And I hope that I am not the only one.‘’ Jozef said.

The forum had the most views in a week than any other on the RSPB’s intranet. More than 2,000 impressions and many comments supporting Jozef’s statement helped to preserve the charity’s name and heritage.

Furthermore, the name of the charity and its history became one of the main focus points on the RSPB’s website.

client
RSPB

sector
charity

discipline
strategy

brand identity
  • logo design
  • identity
  • rebranding
  • stationery design
  • social media design
  • photography
website design
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  • photography for your website
support
  • web hosting
  • website backup
  • website security
  • email hosting
  • domain support
  • training
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